Susan Stanaway nee Anderson (Anihana)

This week I have been in contact with descendants of Te Ruhi Taonui who are having a reunion later this year. (www.anihanareunion.com)

We have been discussing if our Susan Anderson is the daughter of John Havelock Anderson and Te Ruhi Taonui. Currently the descendents of Te Ruhi Taonui had only known that she had 2 sons (born about the same time as our Susan).

If we can confirm that Susan is another child –  I am sure there may be members on this branch of the Stanaway Family Tree who may want to attend the above mentioned reunion – we will keep you posted!

Background taken from my correspondence

  • Susan Stanaway (nee Anderson) is the wife of William Stanaway.
  • From Susan’s Death certificate – we see she is recorded as having been born in the Hokianga (Unfortunately under the heading – parents we only have the fathers surname as Anderson).
  • From the Clark family records – it stated that William had a “half cast Maori wife” – missing the fact that he too was of the same mix – but from a picture recently uncovered (from the Clark photo album) it looks as though he had more European features or was of a lighter skin colour than his wife, and that may have been why he was seen as European.
  • From both the marriage and death certificates we have her being born about 1846-1848.
  • The Clendon Census of the Hokianga in 1846 has only one Anderson – that being John Anderson with NW (Native Wife) and 2 children – listed as a carpenter. She may or may not have been one of these children listed. The next record was the Electoral Roll was in 1854 where he is still the only Anderson in the Hokianga – this unfortunately does not list children and spouses.
  • John Havelock Anderson marries Te Ruhi Taonui (Teruhi Taonui)
  • Te Ruhi Taonui was reported (by John Anderson) to be the half sister of Aperahama Taonui (have the same father) – That father being (Makoare) Te Taonui – chief of Te Popoto (the mother I do not have a record of – I am sure Te Taonui had a number of wives)
  • Susan and William Stanaway had 15 children, they named one of her sons Abraham and another Thomas Anderson Stanaway.
  • Two of her sons are buried at the Oturei Native Cemetery, Aratapu, Kaipara which I understand this Cemetery is on land gifted to Abraham Taonui (highly respected in Maori circles – google him) when he moved from Hokianga to the Kaipara.
  • I have a copy of a letter written by Abraham (Aperaham) Taonui in 1873 written to the Superintendent of Auckland stating JJ Stanaway is a fit and proper person to hold a licence for the Tokatoka Hotel. JJ Stanaway being Susan’s father in law and Abraham Taonui being her half Uncle.

With John Anderson being the only Anderson in the Hokianga and Susan being born there – we have joined the dots – which means surly she must be the daughter of John Anderson and Te Ruhi Taonui?

Apart from doing a DNA test – I think this may be as good as we can get in establishing her parents – I am sure Capt. JJ Stanaway and Capt. John Anderson knew each other from when JJ Stanaway lived in the Hokianga, and that Susan and William may have met (or been set up) through their fathers.

If anyone else has information please let us know – leave a reply below.

For those history buffs – here is some more information

  • Te Taonui’s uncle* was the famed Muriwai who died in 1828 (* see Aubz comments below)
  • Te Taonui succeeded Muiwai to be chief of the Te Popoto
  • He had another brother Te Huru – who was killed fighting Hone Heke
  • Te Taonui fought Heke at Te Ahuahu – he captured the Pa there.
  • One son was Aperahama – his mother was Hinuata (of Ngatirehia)
  • Te Taonui was known also as “Makoare” – Macquarie being the English spelling adopted after his trip to Sydney with Samuel Marsden.
  • Te Taonui signed the Treaty of Waitangi in the Hokianga.

 

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Susan Stanaway nee Anderson (Anihana)

  1. Geoff Bell

    Your final web Stanaway pages are great & I will pass them on to my wife’s family- Buckworth.
    Concerning Susan Anderson married to William Henry Stanaway, there is the possibility that her dad if it was as I believe was John Anderson who lived & died at Hokianga could have had more than one wife or lovers at the same time ! There was only one known Anderson being James & wife from Hobart who entered via Hokianga & they had moved south by 1850s. The only other Andersons at the right age died at the same time in NZ & were this was is not known. More importantly to me these other two Andersons came to NZ with as i presume white wives, It appears to me (being an ignorant Australian & 25% NZ) that a NZ 100% white parent or a 100% white girl in 1871 would probably not have married a 1/2 Maori unless she was 1/2 Maori herself. I was left with Susan Anderson born in Hokianga about 1848 on her marriage certificate with her family’s understanding in 1921 that her dad was named Anderson but believed she could have been born in 1846. The Australian Buckworth family just understood that Susan & William’ s daughter Emily Annie Stanaway was part Maori, which is not much help.
    Also John Anderson & John James Stanaway would know each other in Hokianga in 1840 & both could sail & it makes sense that their children may have met later via travelling my boat.
    I think it will be just left as an educated guess by me- not a blood relative but if others can help, well thanks.
    Geoff Bell from NSW Australia
    lisa_geoff@optusnet.com.au

    Like

    Reply
  2. Aubz

    Ko Te Ahuriri
    Ko Makoare Te Taonui
    Aperahama Te Taonui his sister Te Ruhi Te Taonui

    Muriwai ka moe a Te Rawhi 4th wife
    Muriwai Hepehi – (son)
    Pereene Muriwai (Hepehi)
    Te Wairua Pereene Muriwai (Hepehi) – Brown Muriwai
    Kaikinikini John Muriwai my father
    I have the whakapapa to Muriwai 4 lines

    Ahuriri is the eldest brother of Rangaunu and Muriwai
    Makoare Te Taonui is Muriwai nefew not his brother
    Aperahama Te taonui manuscript a good place to start,
    Maori landcourt minute books Hokianga 21,22
    0224357952 if you feel the need to contact me
    mihinui kia koutou e te whanau.

    Like

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.